Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Today In Blues History September 14

Today in Blues History


September 14


In 1889, Tom Delaney an African-American blues and jazz songwriter, pianist and singer, who wrote a number of popular songs, mainly in the 1920s was born in Charleston, South Carolina. His work was recorded by many of the more fashionable singers and musicians of the period and later times, including Lillyn Brown, Lucille Hegamin, Ethel Waters, Earl Hines, Count Basie, Bix Beiderbecke, Big Joe Williams, Clara Smith, Alberta Hunter, Clarence Williams, James P. Johnson, Woody Herman, Bukka White, Toots Thielemans, and Dinah Washington. Although known primarily as a writer of other performers songs, Delaney recorded a small amount of his own material.




Also born on this day in 1952 is Darrell Nulisch who was born in Dallas, TX. Nulisch, a singer and harmonica player who prior to his solo career, was a member of Anson Funderburgh and the Rockets and The Broadcasters. Nulisch's repertoire incorporates soul combined with R&B and Chicago blues, redesigned to complement his distinctive vocals. He sang with Anson Funderburgh's Rockets until 1985 then was then part of Mike Morgan's Crawl, before moving to Massachusetts and joining up with Ronnie Earl's Broadcasters in 1988. He began his solo career late in 1990, relocating to Boston. James Cotton then asked him to sing with Cotton's band on tour, after Cotton had lost his own voice.



1981 saw the passing of Walter E. “Furry” Lewis in Memphis, TN. Lewis was an American country blues guitarist and songwriter and was one of the first of the blues musicians active in the 1920s to be brought out of retirement and given new opportunities to record during the folk blues revival of the 1960s. Lewis made his first recordings for Vocalion Records in Chicago in 1927. A year later he recorded for Victor Records at the Memphis Auditorium, in a session with the Memphis Jug Band, Jim Jackson, Frank Stokes, and others. He again recorded for Vocalion in Memphis in 1929. The tracks were mostly blues but included two-part versions of "Casey Jones" and "John Henry." He sometimes fingerpicked and sometimes played with a slide. He recorded many successful records in the late 1920s, including "Kassie Jones", "Billy Lyons & Stack-O-Lee" and "Judge Harsh Blues" (later called "Good Morning Judge").



September 14 also saw the passing of Laten Johnny Adams in Baton Rouge, LA after a long battle with prostate cancer. Better known ass Johnny Adams, he was a blues, jazz and gospel singer, known as "The Tan Canary" for the multi-octave range of his singing voice, his swooping vocal mannerisms and falsetto. His biggest hits were his versions of "Release Me" and "Reconsider Me" in the late 1960s. In 1983, he signed with Rounder Records, for which he recorded nine critically acclaimed albums produced by Scott Billington, beginning with From the Heart in 1984. These records encompassed a wide range of jazz, blues and R&B styles and highlighted Adams's voice. The albums included tributes to the songwriters Percy Mayfield and Doc Pomus. The jazz-influenced Good Morning Heartache included the work of composers like George Gershwin and Harold Arlen. Other albums in this series are Room with a View of the Blues (1988), Walking on a Tightrope (1989), and The Real Me (1991). These recordings earned him a number of awards, including a W.C. Handy Award. He also toured internationally, with frequent trips to Europe, and worked and recorded with such musicians as Aaron Neville, Harry Connick Jr., Lonnie Smith, and Dr. John.




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